My Picks for Wednesday 3-30-2016

This is the stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

If you are involved in church leadership, be on the lookout for these subtle signs described by the always insightful Carey Nieuwhof…

7 Subtle Signs Your Church Is DyingCarey Nieuwhof
church is dying
6. You criticize younger, upstart leaders

Every leader is a young leader at some point.

Young leaders bring innovation, ideas and strategies to the table. In fact, they likely got your church to where it is today. Which is amazing.

But no one stays young forever.

After a decade in leadership, you’ll find yourself surrounded by younger leaders with different ideas.

Rather than deciding to learn from them, leaders of dying churches resist them, dismiss them and sometimes ridicule them.

That’s a critical mistake.”


Non-finishers are difficult to work with…

Are You a Self-Starter, But Not a Self-Finisher?
Eric McKiddie
self-finisher“…there can be a dark side to self-starters, which is when their interest in beginning new projects and their disinterest in finishing projects are equal.

It’s when you get close to the finish line that the real work begins. At that point, do you press through to the end, or do you get distracted by new ideas that sound more fun? …

…Finishing also gives you credibility. It builds trust in your supervisor, because he or she knows they don’t have to pester you to complete what you’ve committed to do. It builds trust among your church members, too, since churches are notorious for coming up with good ideas and then never executing them (or taking forever to do so). I get proud of the team I work with when members of our church comment to me that things actually get done around here.”


I very much appreciate Ed’s observations in this article…

The Future of Music in the ChurchEd Stetzer
The Future of Music in the Church“Now, I get that there are a thousand variants of musical style. My concern is more with the implications than the descriptions, but it is worth noting that we are the only generation in recorded history that can list its worship style by generation.

Hence, the point…

We’ve gone through a monumental shift of style in our lifetime, which has never happened before. If you were living between 1860 and 1890, you didn’t have the option of choosing between three generations of churches. But think about the remarkable shift that took place from 1960 to 1990.

My main concern is that the current patterns may not be sustainable…

…Most churches are going to make the transition to feel more contemporary than traditional…

I’m not saying you should. I’m not saying it’s the only way. And, I am not even saying it’s the best way.

But, most churches are changing…

…People often say “We’ve got to teach them the value of the hymns” which they tend to associate with a traditional musical style. If by learning the value of hymns, you mean having a more robust theology in lyrics, I agree. If you mean that we need (as a measure of discipleship) to teach them an old musical style—I want you to hear this, so I’ll say it very clearly: That’s missing the point.

Church survival doesn’t depend on music style…

…I leave you with this: most churches that want to reach their community will be more, rather than less, contemporary. As churches embrace that reality on the other side of the worship wars, we can (and should) bring back some of the things that might have been left behind—like more depth, broader variety, and congregational singing across generations.”


Wanna buy a used car?

The 6-Wheeled Monster Convertible From “The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen” Is on eBayEzra Dyer


Artist humor…
http://bizarro.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/bz-panel-03-21-16.jpg
Source: Bizarro

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