Category Archives: My Stuff

This is material I wrote.

Remember when we used to _________?

remember-when2

“Remember when we_______________?”

“Man, that was great.”

“How come we don’t do that anymore?”

Have you ever been part of a conversation like that? I was a worship minister for 30 years. I’ve had that same conversation approximately a billion times. The blank has been filled in by different things at different times over the years but it was the same conversation. Here are a few of the things that have been inserted in the blank:

Had a Sunday night church service.
Did a Living Christmas Tree (Remember those?)
Had a handbell choir.
Used an organ.
Wore choir robes.
Wore ties when we served. (BTW-Research has proven that the first century Christians never wore ties.)
Did Broadway-style Christmas productions.
Sang the old songs.
etc.

The blank varied but the insinuation was always the same.

The implication was that what we do now is inferior. We think that the church has lost its former glory. We remember the way things used to be, the important place some of those things had in our lives and in the life of the church, and we have trouble seeing the wonderful things that are being done right now, and the way God is moving in our people and activities right now.

Maybe we need to open our eyes, and hearts, to the possibility that God has something in mind that we can’t imagine.

The Israelites were in captivity for 70 years in Babylon. When they were finally released and allowed to return to their homeland they undertook the huge task of rebuilding the temple. There were some older folks who were alive before the earlier temple was destroyed and they remember what it was like.

Ezra 3:10-13
When the builders laid the foundation of the temple of the Lord, the priests in their vestments and with trumpets, and the Levites (the sons of Asaph) with cymbals, took their places to praise the Lord, as prescribed by David king of Israel. With praise and thanksgiving they sang to the Lord:

“He is good;
his love toward Israel endures forever.”

And all the people gave a great shout of praise to the Lord, because the foundation of the house of the Lord was laid. But many of the older priests and Levites and family heads, who had seen the former temple, wept aloud when they saw the foundation of this temple being laid, while many others shouted for joy. No one could distinguish the sound of the shouts of joy from the sound of weeping, because the people made so much noise. And the sound was heard far away.

There have been times in my ministry when it seemed like the same thing was happening. There were people who would be moved in powerful ways by the things that God was doing through our church while others could see nothing but things that upset them. The shouts of joy and the sound of weeping were occurring simultaneously. The celebrants couldn’t (or wouldn’t) understand the complainers and the complainers couldn’t (or wouldn’t) see what the celebration was all about.

Maybe we need to open our eyes, and hearts, to the possibility that God has something in mind that we can’t imagine.

God had something BIG in mind for the new temple. Listen to this:

Haggai 2:3,6-9
‘Who of you is left who saw this house in its former glory? How does it look to you now? Does it not seem to you like nothing?

“This is what the Lord Almighty says: ‘In a little while I will once more shake the heavens and the earth, the sea and the dry land. I will shake all nations, and what is desired by all nations will come, and I will fill this house with glory,’ says the Lord Almighty. ‘The silver is mine and the gold is mine,’ declares the Lord Almighty. ‘The glory of this present house will be greater than the glory of the former house,’ says the Lord Almighty. ‘And in this place I will grant peace,’ declares the Lord Almighty.”

Maybe we need to open our eyes, and hearts, to the possibility that God has something in mind that we can’t imagine.

Lloyd

 

25 Things

Several years ago there was a thing circulating around Facebook called “25 Things.” The idea was that you would write down 25 random things about yourself so that others would be able to know a bit more about you. I suppose there was a degree of narcissism involved as well, which made it doubly fun.

Anyway, I ran across my list today and thought it might make for a fun blog post. Fun for me, anyway.

So, here (with a little updating) are 25 Things about myself which you may find interesting or amusing…or maybe just narcissistic.


  1. I fell in love with my wife when I was 5 years old and I don’t think that ever stopped. Though we sort of went different ways for a while now that I look back on it I think it was what God had in mind all along. I do know that – knowing all that I know now – marrying Kathie was, other than maybe deciding to follow Jesus, the best decision I ever made. I can’t imagine life without her.
  1. I never thought I would be, nor did I have any desire to be a minister. However, I have absolutely no doubt that, in being on staff in the three churches I served over the past 35 years, I was exactly where God wanted me to be, doing exactly what He wanted me to do. It’s a long story but I have come to the conclusion that God has plans for us that, if we knew about them ahead of time, we would reject them out of hand. It’s amazing how He works in our lives to bring us around – we just have to take the next step.
  1. I can waste an incredible amount of time without even trying. However, when I do get started on a project it tends to consume me until it’s finished.
  1. I have a tendency to make jokes at inappropriate times.
  1. I have been surrounded by women my entire life. I’m excited to say that I now have 2 grandsons
    The boys – Asher & Oliver

    but I grew up with 2 sisters, I have 2 daughters, even our pets have always been female. The main male influence in my life, other than my Papaw (who was significant) was my Dad.

    Bob Hamilton – Christmas 2014

    I don’t think I can overestimate my respect for him. And now, as I look back on it, I think one of the most important things I learned from him was how to treat women (not that I understand them any better).

  1. I am not a very social person. I MUCH prefer spending time with a few real friends or my family than with a large gathering of acquaintances and strangers.
  1. I have friends who mean more to me than I ever thought possible.
  1. Music – I don’t think that there is a “genre” of music that I can’t appreciate on some level but there is something about the sound of a 16 piece jazz band that transcends the rest. When I say I love “big band” music many think only of the nostalgic sound of the 40’s – for me the attraction is not nostalgia – it’s the intricacy of design required to bring 16 musicians together for a common end combined with the freedom of improvisation for the individuals in the group that makes it powerful to me. Recordings are good but you have to experience it live.
  1. I might be a little competitive.
  1. There was a time when it was difficult for me to actually worship when I was leading worship because of all the details I had to think about. Over time, however, I began to find it difficult to worship when I was NOT leading worship. I’d be too busy analyzing and critiquing. In retirement I find I’m still having trouble with this.
  1. I never made great grades in school (better in college than HS but still…)
  1. Except music.
  1. I am indescribably proud of the adults that my kids have become (are becoming?). I can’t say I was thrilled with all their choices, (I’m not always thrilled with my own) or that there weren’t times that they frustrated me with their immaturity, (I’m often frustrated with my own immaturity) BUT I am completely impressed with who they are and where they are going.
    L-R: Liz, me, Kate

    They are easily the most interesting and fascinating people I know and they both have a depth of character that impresses the socks off me. They also crack me up.

  1. L-R: Asher, Iris, Oliver

    Being a grandparent is waaay more fun than I ever imagined! Sometimes they wear me out…but still.

 

 

  1. I truly detest the thought of getting old.
    I joke about it, but I hate it.
  1. I’ve never really struggled with being overweight or with my overall health but I do struggle with keeping myself fit – ok maybe I don’t struggle enough.
  1. Ice cream is the best! (why did I think of that next?)
  1. I really enjoy driving. In fact I’m sort of feeling the urge for a road trip right now.
  1. I appreciate the grace of God more every day. There was a time when I was a bit of a legalist but I find that the older I get the more I realize how much I need grace, consequently I’m more willing to extend grace than when I was young.
  1. However, I could never make it as a counselor – I’m pretty impatient.
  1. I’m on a lifelong quest for the world’s best cheeseburger. So far, the best one I’ve ever had was here in 2007 with our good friends, Bruce and Kathy Maxwell.

    DSCN2273
    The Haunted Hamburger, Jerome Arizona – 2007
  1. Worship – it’s not about “style”.
  1. I’ve always had a strong sense of my roots.
    Five generations. (Hint: I’m the kid.)

    I was raised with family history and it affects who I am today – it makes me deeply happy that my kids seem to feel the same way.

  1. I have never even considered trying to smoke. It’s not that I’m so goody-goody it simply has always disgusted me.
  1. I love finishing things.

On Family and Church

Hamiltons – Christmas 2013 Photo by Katy C Photography

Let me tell you about my family.

My name is Lloyd. At the time of this writing I am 62 years old, the oldest child of parents Bob & Faye. My dad is 83 and my mom is 80. They were both very young when they married in 1952 and I was born the following year while Dad was in the Air Force. Four years later my sister Rhonda was born and eight years after that (Surprise!) my sister Ginger was born.

In 1974, at the tender age of 21, I married Kathie, my high school sweetheart. We had been married for 7 years when Liz was born. Two years later Kate was born and our little family of four was complete. Well, that’s what we thought until our grandkids were born!

Kate married Timm in 2006 and our family began growing some more. Iris was born the following year and is now 8 years old (I can’t believe it!), Asher came along 2 years later and little Oliver was born just this summer on the Fourth of July, 2015.

Also, Liz began dating Trent a few years ago and he has become very much a part of our family.

If you’re keeping track, that’s a total of 13 people ranging in age from 83 years to 4 months.

But wait…there’s more.

My sister Rhonda married in 1981. She’s divorced now, but while they were married they had 3 children: Chris, Becky and Mike. Chris is married and he and his wife, Mary have 2 beautiful daughters: Elliot and Harper. Becky married a handsome young man named Josh about two years ago. No kids…yet. And we recently took a road trip to Baltimore for Mike and Kristin’s wedding.

My baby sister Ginger eloped with her boyfriend Bob in 1993. Their daughter Sara is now a college student.

Twenty-three people.

Single people. Divorced people. Newlyweds. Oldlyweds (63 years!). Boomers. Gen-Xers. Millennials. Republicans. Democrats. Jazzers. Rockers. Headbangers. Country music lovers! Video gamers. Musicians. Writers. Artists. Teachers. Public servants. Medical professionals. Accountants. Techies. Care-givers. People in need of care-giving.

When you think about it, we have more differences than we do similarities. What do we have in common? Nothing.

Well, there is one thing:

DNA.

Also, we are each somewhere along a path from utter dependence on others in the family, to being responsible for others in the family, and back again to dependence. As we travel along this path, I think we can look at our role in terms of need, contribution and responsibility.

Early in our lives our need is great. We are responsible for nothing and our contribution is measured in terms of the joy we bring to our parents, grandparents and great-grandparents as they see to our needs and watch us grow and develop.

As the years pass into our teens, if things develop normally, our need lessens and our contribution increases. We begin to learn what it means to have responsibility for things and ourselves. Certainly, we still have needs, and others are ultimately responsible for us, but we’re learning.

When we move into adulthood we find that we now shoulder real responsibility. We are not dependent on others to sustain us. In fact, we are the ones responsible for the well-being of others who are younger (or older) and have greater need. Our contribution during this time is great, even to the point of sacrifice at times for the need of others.

Then, of course, as we grow into old age we find our personal need increasing. Our level of responsibility begins to subside and our contribution is mainly in the area of mentoring and the sharing of wisdom gained over the years. The rest of the family begins to see us as their foundation, and if our life has been lived well, they love us and appreciate us for being a positive example and influence in their lives. They may be filled with gratitude that we have built this family into something they can be proud of. We will find, however, that while our family respects us, cares for us, and is there to help when needed, their lives no longer revolve around us.

I believe that’s as it should be.


White Oak Christian Church – Colerain Campus, December 2, 2012

Now, let me tell you about my church family.

Single people. Divorced people. Newlyweds. Oldlyweds. Boomers. Gen-Xers. Millennials. Republicans. Democrats. Jazzers. Rockers. Headbangers. Country music lovers! Video gamers. Musicians. Writers. Artists. Teachers. Public servants. Medical professionals. Accountants. Techies. Care-givers. People in need of care-giving.

When you think about it, we have more differences than we do similarities. What do we have in common? Nothing.

Well, there is one thing:

Jesus.

Also, we are each somewhere along a path from utter dependence to responsibility and back again to dependence.

Early in our spiritual lives our need is great. We are responsible for nothing and our contribution is measured in terms of the joy we bring to the rest of the church as they see to our needs and watch our lives change as we grow and develop.

As the years pass into our spiritual adolescence, if things develop normally, our need lessens and our contribution increases. We begin to learn what it means to have responsibility for things and ourselves. Certainly, we still have needs, and others are ultimately responsible for us, but we’re learning.

When we move into spiritual maturity we find that we now shoulder real responsibility. We are not dependent on others to sustain us. In fact, we are the ones responsible for the well-being of others who are younger (or older) and have greater need. Our contribution during this time is great, even to the point of sacrifice at times for the need of others.

Then, of course, as we grow into old age we find our level of responsibility begins to subside and our contribution is mainly in the area of mentoring and the sharing of wisdom gained over the years. The rest of the church begins to see us as their foundation, and if our life has been lived well, they love us and appreciate us for being a positive example and influence in their lives. They may be filled with gratitude that we have built this church into something they can be proud of. We will find, however, that while our church family respects us,  cares for us, and is there to help when we have need, their lives no longer revolve around us.

I believe that’s as it should be.

Don’t you?

Lloyd

 

Can you imagine?

Book of imagination by t1na
What if you had all the time in the world?

What if money were no object?

What if you were fearless?

What if you had talent?

What if you never felt inadequate?

What if you had the ability to become friends with anyone?

What if you had the dreams of a child
combined with the wisdom of the ages?

What if nothing stood in your way?

Use your imagination…

What can you imagine accomplishing for God if you had all the resources of the universe at your disposal?

Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen.
-Ephesians 3:20-21

Lloyd

Image by Martina Stipan at Deviant Art

Take the Next Step

Jesus loved to tell stories. He said and did things that were controversial. Things He said caused debate among the people and the religious leaders of the time and, in fact, are still being discussed today. And not just in church.

If you read the gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke & John), the books that tell the story of His life, you’ll find that Jesus very rarely gave a straight-up answer to a question. His teachings were never bullet point lectures.

“6 Steps to a Better You.”

“5 Ways to Get the Most Out of Life.”

“7 Amazing Life Hacks – Your jaw will drop at number 5!”

No, “click-bait” wasn’t His style. Not exactly.

The religious leaders of the time would often try to stump Jesus with a trick question designed to tie Him up in knots. Whenever they would do that He would pause, look them in the eye, and say something like, “Have I ever told you the one about the son who squandered his inheritance?” And everyone would sort of roll their eyes and try to track with Him.

He would tell this open-ended story with His own question at the end, like a riddle.

I wonder why he did that.

His disciples wondered, too, and one day they asked Him…

Matthew 13:10-13
10 Then the disciples came and said to him, “Why do you speak to them in parables?” 11 And he answered them, “To you it has been given to know the secrets of the kingdom of heaven, but to them it has not been given. 12 For to the one who has, more will be given, and he will have an abundance, but from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away. 13 This is why I speak to them in parables…

Even their question about His teaching style was answered with a sort of riddle!

When I read these verses I get the feeling that Jesus is saying that there are certain answers discovered only by taking the next step. Sometimes you don’t really understand until you go on the journey. You may want to have all your questions resolved ahead of time but that’s just not going to happen.

Here’s an example: Parenting.

You can read every book and go to every class about being a good parent but until you actually get in the game you don’t know a thing. True? You have your first child and before too long you realize that you’re just making it up as you go along. But you learn. As new parents you can double-team the child. There are 2 of you and one of them so you figure out how to parent in that situation. And about the time you sort of get into a pattern and feel like you’re getting a handle on this parenting thing, the 2nd child comes along and you have to shift to a man-to-man defense. It’s 1 on 1 and it requires some different types of strategies. But you learn it as you go. I’m not sure what happens when that 3rd and 4th child comes along. I suppose you have to shift to some sort of zone defense, but we never got to that point. What I’m saying is that the book learning, advance planning, and parenting classes are all good things, but the truth is that you don’t really learn parenting until you become parents.

DSC_0898There are just some answers in life that aren’t discovered until we take the next step.

I believe this is profoundly true of the Christian life.

You and I may be in completely different places on our journey with Jesus, but I can pretty much guarantee that, anyplace along the path, the only way we get closer to Him, the only way we grow in our discipleship, is by taking the next step. By obediently putting into practice the things we’ve already learned. These things may not make absolute sense ahead of time, and we may still have questions, but it’s when we take that next step of faith that we get answers…

…answers that we would otherwise never learn.

Lloyd

PS – I recently went on little hike in the woods with my grandson Asher. That’s when the photo was taken.

 

I’m a Reds fan, but…

http://cincinnati.reds.mlb.com/mlb/images/team_logos/social_media/og_1200x630_image/cin_1200x630.jpg
I want to begin by stating it clearly, unequivocally,
and for the record.

I am a Cincinnati Reds fan.

The 2015 baseball season has not changed that fact.

But…

When I finally came to the realization in the final weeks of the season that the Reds had not one shred of an iota of a chance at the post-season (which, in retrospect, I should have realized back in June) I started rooting for the Cubs.

Let there be no misunderstanding. I emphatically did NOT become a Cubs fan, but I did start hoping they would do well. I rooted for the Reds to beat the Pirates in their last series, not so much for the Reds record, which was beyond help, but so that the Cubs could get home field advantage for the playoffs.

It seemed like the thing to do, you know? I have a lot of friends who are die-hard, no-matter-what, forever-and-ever, world-without-end, Cubs fans. So, I hoped the Cubs would finish the season strong for their sake. Yes, I have a lot of friends who are St. Louis Cardinals fans, too…but rooting for the Cardinals was just too unthinkable.

So, like a friend of the homecoming king and queen standing along the gym wall, I watched them dance and wished them well.

What could it hurt?

It hurt bad.

The season is really over for me now. Oh, I’ll watch the rest of the playoffs and the World Series, but I have no emotional attachment to any of the teams.

It’s like I’m standing along the wall of the gym and I don’t even know the homecoming king or queen.

I think I may even be at the wrong school.

Lloyd

 

Why do preachers talk so much about money?

money-02Why do preachers talk so much about money?

At WOCC we are in the final year of our ENGAGE vision campaign. The goal of this campaign was to get everyone excited about what God is doing here and where He’s taking us, and to fund this vision for the next three years debt-free. At the beginning, this campaign caused me to think quite a bit about money and it challenged Kathie and me to a whole new level of giving. (Now, the fact of my recent retirement has caused me to revisit that subject from a whole new perspective! But I digress.)

Inevitably, during a campaign such as this, and during the typical fall “stewardship emphasis” the question comes up: “Why do preachers talk so much about money?”

Seems to me there are two answers to that question, depending on what you mean.

If by “so much” you really mean “too much” the answer is simply this:

They don’t.

I can tell you sincerely that it’s just not true. Every single preacher I’ve ever known (and I know a LOT of preachers) hated talking about money. They just never got real stoked about preaching that yearly “stewardship series”. They did it because they knew they had to. And the reason they felt they had to is probably not the reason you’re thinking.

However, if by “so much” you really mean “at all,” here’s why…

Preachers don’t teach about money just to get the offerings up. They do it because they know that the way we handle money is as much a mark of discipleship as our sexual morals, our prayer life and our Bible learning…and anything else you can think of. From time to time you’ll hear (or maybe, say) something along the lines of: “We shouldn’t talk about money. Let’s just reach out to people with the gospel and the money will follow.” The thing is, we don’t approach any other area of discipleship like that. “We shouldn’t talk about living a moral life. Let’s just reach out with the gospel and the morality will follow.” While it’s true that the gospel changes lives from within it doesn’t mean we stop teaching about what it means to live life as a Christ-follower. Jesus’ teaching (Now THERE was a preacher who talked a LOT about money!) was that the use of our money is the BEST indicator of a person’s discipleship. In Matthew chapter 6 he tells us that where we put our money is where our hearts will be. So to determine what is really important to us and what it is that we value and trust the most, we have simply to ask ourselves the question, “Where do we put our money?”

So preachers talk about money.

And, just in case you think that your church doesn’t need to grow in this area of discipleship, I challenge you to do a little research and a little math.

Take a couple minutes and Google the average household income for your area (county, city…whatever). I did it for Colerain Township. Then check how many households would be considered members of your church. Multiply the average income with the number of church households and you’ll have something close to the total income of your church family.

Now I realize that the tithe was an Old Covenant requirement and we’re now under grace. I get that. But the point of the whole tithe thing was for us to learn that God really owns everything anyway. So, for convenience sake, let’s just start with a tenth. If everyone in your church gave a tithe, one tenth of the household income, what could your church budget be? I don’t care if you calculate it on gross or net, I’d be willing to bet your church budget is nowhere close to what it could be under those conditions. Imagine the good that could be done in your community if that were to happen.

So, do preachers talk too much about money?

It would seem not.

Lloyd

The “R” Word

RetiremeRocking Chairnt.

RETIREMENT?

During the months leading up to my retirement date I had quite a bit of trouble simply wrapping my brain around the concept. It’s not that it was a new idea. I had been thinking, praying, and talking with a few close friends about it for over a year. It’s not that I didn’t think it was the right move. It seemed most of the conversations I had with close friends, and so many of the little “moments” and circumstances served to confirm for me that it was the right thing to do. Right for the church and right for me.

However, there were two big concepts I had trouble with:
How did I get here so fast? And, what next?

The first issue is nothing new. I’ve known people who have retired and they seem so…well, so old! I had (have?) a hard time using that word (“retirement,” not “old.” Ok…”old” too) in reference to myself! The older I get the faster time seems to go by. It’s cliché, I realize. But when something is so universally true, that’s what happens. It becomes cliché. But it’s a cliché that I feel in the depths of my soul. I mean, if this life is a bridge, I’m probably somewhere between 2/3 and 3/4 of the way across.

The second issue is a little more specific.

My church put on a lovely reception for Kathie and me that was very fun and touching. I remember thinking I should have set up a big poster with FAQs because I think I answered the same question several million times: “So, now what are you going to do?” I suppose it would be more accurate to say that I tried to answer it.

Is it typical to ask that question of someone who is retiring? Maybe it is, but I don’t think I was prepared with a good answer. I had some vague idea of some of the things I wanted to do but the truth is it was very vague and I was primarily looking forward to the free time to not worry so much about doing but to let myself just be. I had a hard time putting that thought into words, and looking back on that sentence, I realize that it still doesn’t sound like much of an answer, but there it is.

So now, about 7 weeks into this thing called retirement, I have found that, generally speaking, the adjustment is an easy one. That’s not to say that I feel like I have completely adjusted or that I have a better answer to the question, “What next?”

One adjustment example: I spent almost one whole day going through the 600 or so photos we took on a recent vacation. I culled (down to about 150), cropped, edited, ordered, captioned and uploaded to FB. (You can see them here.) I was surprised to find that I felt guilty about spending so much time on something that probably wasn’t important to anyone but me. But then again, that’s just the kind of thing I was looking forward to having the time for!

During the first few months of retirement I have also sensed the need to separate from my church for a time. This is both for me and for them. I’ve been attending a different church every week. While this has been good in some ways for the short term, it is not healthy over the long haul. (Plus, apparently Kathie hates it!) It will be another adjustment for me, when the time is right (…and if Kath has her way, the time may be right sooner than I thought…), to become a church member instead of a staff member. I haven’t been that since 1980.

I’m at the point now where I’m feeling the need to organize my time rather than just doing whatever whenever. So, my next step is to add some structure to my day. I want to write for this web site. (I promise that all my posts will not include this much “navel-gazing.”) I want to work on some musical projects. There are some other things I have in mind, but in order to be productive in any of these areas I hear that it’s important to have some discipline…my favorite thing…

Bottom line: So far, retirement is good. I recommend it.

 

My First Blog Post

I suppose it makes sense to start by explaining who I am and what you can expect to find here.

Who I Am

My name is Lloyd Hamilton and I have recently retired from 35 years as a full-time church staffer. The first 6 years was as a youth minister and the next 29 as minister of worship. Those were my titles, but the truth is I’ve done a little bit of everything when it comes to serving on a church staff.

I’ve been married to Kathie, my high school sweetheart, since 1974 and we have 2 grown daughters and 3 (so far) grandkids. (I’m fairly confident that they will show up here from time to time.)

I love Jesus, my family, the church, worship, music, movies and Cincinnati Reds baseball. These are the things that will drive the content of this site, but I have a curiosity about a wide range of subjects so you never know what might show up here.

What You Can Expect

  1. I plan to write about things that I care about…whatever is on my mind at the time. I’ve already mentioned some of those things so it will likely, but not necessarily, relate to one of those areas. My plan is to write and post 2 or 3 times per week.
  2. The second thing I plan to do is to share links to other material that I find helpful, challenging, informative or simply entertaining.
  3. The third category of posts will be devotional in nature. I have this thought that, when we read scripture, we often approach the text by asking questions of it…and of God. I believe this is a helpful way to deepen our knowledge and understanding of the content. But I wonder what would happen if we turned that around? What if we read scripture to see what it (and God) is asking of us? My plan is to read through the Bible and share the questions it seems God is asking of me…to let Him examine me. I’ll share a little more about this as we go, but I plan to post one of these “God Questions” each day.
  4. Finally, I plan to have a page where you can find some arrangements of hymns that I’m making available for those of you who are fellow worship leaders and church musicians. I’m offering arrangements of hymns only because they are in the public domain and there is no need to deal with copyrights. These are worship band arrangements of hymns that I have written and used over the years. Check the “Hymn Arrangements” page for more details.

Thanks for stopping by and please feel free to share and comment on anything you find here. I hope you stay with me for a while and that we get to know each other better in the coming months and years as we travel across the bridge together.

Lloyd