Tag Archives: Parenting

Thursday Picks ~ 4-6-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

Interesting and insightful…

The Strange Persistence of GuiltDavid Brooks
McClay is describing a world in which we’re still driven by an inextinguishable need to feel morally justified. Our thinking is still vestigially shaped by religious categories.

And yet we have no clear framework or set of rituals to guide us in our quest for goodness. Worse, people have a sense of guilt and sin, but no longer a sense that they live in a loving universe marked by divine mercy, grace and forgiveness. There is sin but no formula for redemption.

The only reliable way to feel morally justified in that culture is to assume the role of victim…


I appreciate so much this thoughtful testimony…

Why I Gave Up AlcoholSarah Bessey
I think that conviction has gotten a bit of a bad rap in the Church over the past little while.

It’s understandable. We have an overcorrection to a lot of the legalism and boundary-marker Christianity that damaged so many, the behaviour modification and rule-making and imposition of other people’s convictions onto our own souls.

But in our steering away from legalism, I wonder if we left the road to holiness or began to forget that God also cares about what we do and how we do it and why.

Conviction is less about condemnation than it is about invitation. It’s an invitation into freedom. It’s an invitation into wholeness.

Perhaps our choices towards those invitations from God are really an intersection for our agency or free will and the Holy Spirit’s activity – maybe that’s where transformation begins.

I quit drinking because I felt like God asked me to quit drinking. I’ve never regretted saying yes to God.


Warning: Challenging stuff here…

Raising Persecution-Ready KidsMelissa Edgington
Lately I have felt such a sense of urgency. Why are Christians continuing to treat this faith as if it is a poorly producing side business in the middle of a hugely prosperous life? Why are Christians abandoning their church families so their kids can play baseball on Sundays? Why are Christians refusing to teach their children the hard truths of Scripture, and why are they reluctant to learn them themselves? Why are Christians satisfied with a faith that only vaguely informs their decisions, that only mildly affects their thinking, that only produces warm feelings and never heart-crushing, soul-wrenching grief over their sin?

Our children are facing a different world than we have known. Their faith is going to have to be real and alive and immune to the mesmerizing but useless distractions of this world. Our children are going to need a faith that devours their entire lives, that dominates every thought, that changes the way they see and hear and understand everything around them. We simply cannot continue to categorize our lives, badly arranging our priorities around things that don’t last. If we keep sending the message that this faith is just part of our lives and not the only thing that matters, then our children will continue to believe us.

They will settle for a version of Christianity that will not stand.


I Went to Amazon’s Physical Bookstore And…
Randall Payleitner
Amazon BooksOne of the largest tech companies in the world just opened a physical store where 90+% of the merchandise for sale is based on 500-year old technology…

Here were my biggest nine impressions after spending an hour at the newest bookstore in Chicago…


Financial planning…
Non Sequitur – Click image for a larger view.

Monday Picks ~ 4-3-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

Yeah, I didn’t do too well…

George Will’s 2017 Opening Day Quiz
Baseball numbers aren’t difficult. But be precise: As players say after a close play, “Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades.” And don’t be discouraged if some questions stump you. As Phillies manager Danny Ozark said in 1976, “Even Napoleon had his Watergate.” And as Brewers manager Harvey Kuenn said after losing the 1982 World Series to the Cardinals, “We’re going to hang our heads high.” Now, name the player or players who…


This older article recently came to my attention. Good stuff…

How To Know Whether You’re Trusting God…or Just Being StupidCarey Nieuwhof
risk
What is a Godly decision?

Is it always wise, prudent, restrained, responsible?
Or is it always risky, edgy, out-there, half-crazed?
Or neither?
Or both?

That’s a tough one, isn’t it?

For the record, I don’t believe there’s an easy way, five step, bullet proof way to resolve the tension between faith and foolishness…

Here are two questions I’ve started asking myself to help when things aren’t clear:

1. Is ‘wisdom’ killing my trust in God?

2. Does my ‘trust’ in God disregard all wisdom?


Church Life: Keep It Two Chevrons ApartStephen McAlpine
keep-apart-2-chevrons-road-signThe mantra among many evangelicals is often “Couldn’t we be doing more?”   And the answer is “Yes”, it’s always “Yes”. Of course you could be doing more, but the question is should you be doing more? …

…Granted some people have more capacity than others, and can juggle much more, but I see no good reason to fill in all of the white space just because it is there.  No reason to drive bumper to bumper.  For a start it gives you very little reflective time spiritually, and that always, always means there’s a bit of wiggle room for the Accuser to get hold of you.  Unthinking fast paced living can be a real danger spiritually and morally.


I wish I had been better at this…

Parents, Be Quick to ListenMichael Kelley
There is a certain humility you must embrace if you are truly going to listen first rather than speak. It’s the humility that acknowledges your own limitations – that you might not know all the information; you might not be privy to all the details; you might not understand all the dynamics. And this is especially hard for us, as parents, because we would like to know that we do indeed know all the dynamics. If we assume a posture of listening, we are admitting that perhaps we don’t know everything our kids are feeling or thinking or believing.

But if we do embrace this humble posture; if we do ask genuine questions of our children; if we do fight assumption and instead try to understand, then we will set the table for communication that follows. And I for one want my children to know that their father is certainly not perfect, but he will always hear them.


https://www.challies.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Challies_April2-8-06.png“The hour is coming when we shall be astonished to think what mere trifles were once capable of discouraging us.’  -John Newton


Opening Day in Cincinnati…
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Peanuts – Click image for a larger view.

Thursday Picks ~ 3-23-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

I’ll be following this series. Could be interesting…

The Diffusion and Influence of Contemporary WorshipMichael Lee
The Diffusion and Influence of Contemporary WorshipIn part one of this short series exploring research related to the diffusion and influence of the contemporary worship, I will point to some recent findings as it relates to current congregational practices and correlations to congregational growth…

Besides the rapid increase in the adoption of contemporary worship forms over the past 15 years, which will probably not come as a surprise to anyone reading this, more interesting are the conclusions offered in numerous iterations of the FACT studies that the adoption of contemporary worship is correlated to congregational growth and vitality. Here are some excerpts from several studies…


The always challenging and insightful Carey Nieuwhof…

7 Things Christians Should Give Up To Reach Unchurched PeopleCarey Nieuwhofgive up
So many church leaders (staff and volunteer) struggle to lead beyond the preferences of the church members. And as soon as they try, they get inundated with complaints and angry emails. Too many Christians feel like it’s their right to have a church that caters exactly to their tastes and whims, and millions are paying the price for that (including unchurched people).

Catering to the preferences of members is a terrible idea for three reasons.

First, it’s killing the church…

Second, it’s an unwinnable game…

Finally, and most importantly, it’s just wrong…

When your preferences keep unchurched people from the promise of Christ, it’s time to change your preferences.

Here are 7 things Christians should give up to reach unchurched people…


Moms and dads change the world…

Maybe We’re Raising World-ChangersMelissa Edgington
…maybe for now I just need to keep plugging away at the little things God has entrusted me with. This is where I learn to be more like Him. This is where He shows me how real love operates. This is where He demonstrates that His glory is all that matters. And, who knows? Maybe one day He will do something big through me.

Or maybe He already is, I thought, as I watched my firstborn’s eyes dance at the idea of changing the world.


Here’s a little gem that made me smile this morning…
Paul Schaffer and Bill Murray: Happy Street


 

Spring break reality…
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Zits – Click image for a larger view.

This Is Us

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Like most of the country, Kathie and I are completely hooked on This Is Us. We are drawn, week to week, into the intimate relationships of the multi-generational Pearson family. It’s on tonight but I won’t be able to watch until tomorrow, so don’t tell me what happens!

There is a lot to love about this show. The central idea, of course, is the unique way the writers seamlessly connect the story lines of the generations. The device is more than the use of simple flashbacks and “time-hop” story telling, which has become all too common in my opinion. It’s as if we’re standing apart from the constraints of time and watching three stories, separated by time, unfold simultaneously.

There’s the love story of Jack and Rebecca. There’s the story surrounding the birth of their triplets and their doctor. There’s the early story of Randall’s birth father, William as well as William’s relationship with his own mother and brother. There are the stories unfolding in the adult lives of the three siblings: Kevin, Kate and Randall.

The writing is superb, the acting is first-rate. I find the characters to be completely believable. Every episode grabs you by several emotions at once and refuses to let go. Just like real life.

Obviously, one of the things that becomes clear in this show is the powerful influence our parents and grand-parents have on us. On our attitudes, choices and behavior. We all know this to be true, of course, but seldom do we see it portrayed so well or so believably.

My generation, specifically, seems to make a high priority of looking within ourselves to analyze how our parents, for good or ill, have impacted our lives. I believe there is value in this. Particularly if we carry some horrible emotional scar. Understanding is the beginning point to healing.

But what we don’t think about often enough, and what This Is Us is reinforcing in my mind, is how our own present behavior has the power to impact the coming generations. It reminds me that my life is not just about me. It’s about us.

How would it affect my behavior today if I could step outside of time and watch the story of my life, along with the stories of past and future generations of my family unfold simultaneously?

I have many regrets in my own life as a parent. There are moments I can recall, with excruciating clarity, things I said or did that I was sure would leave a lasting scar on my beautiful girls. What I’m learning is that, if you would ask them about my worst parenting mistakes, they would probably remember something completely different. It would likely be something I wasn’t even aware of.

I remember a conversation with one of my girls when she was in about 7th grade, I think. I wish I could remember the context better, but I remember the comfort and encouragement I felt when she said, “I finally realized that you and mom are just people, like me.”

I’ve been a grand-parent now for about ten years. I have found that I’m more intentional about trying to leave my grandkids with something positive.

I wish I had thought of that sooner.

Steve Farrar has said:

“I’m not going to know my great-great grandchildren.
But my great-great grandchildren are going to know me.”

What will they know?

Lloyd

 

Monday Picks ~ 3-6-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

Men Wanted: Come and DieJared C. Wilson
Have you ever seen a military recruitment poster or TV ad that showed wounded soldiers? Ever seen one that showed soldiers taking bullets, medics administering morphine to blood-gushing comrades, or an array of battle-hardened quadriplegics?

No, you have not….

…“Think over what I say.” Mull this over. Consider this. Count the cost. So that when hardship comes — and as Gary Demarest says, “Following Christ causes problems” — you are not acting as if something strange is happening to you (1 Pet. 4:12). Instead, you have a vision of what will be, of the “eternal glory” (2 Tim. 2:10) that lay ahead.


This is so hard for us church leaders to remember and put into practice, even when we know it to be true…

Never Shut UpDanny Franks
When you are sick of saying it, the leaders in your ministry have probably just heard it. When your leaders are sick of hearing it, then everyone else has heard it for the first time.


If you’re already paranoid, you might want to skip this one…

Zuckerberg World PresidentJean-Louis Gassée
I used to greatly admire Mark Zuckerberg. Now, I fear him.

Here’s why…

…Facebook is accountable to no one but Mark Zuckerberg, an immensely intelligent and long-range thinker. His company sells persuasion tools to manufacturers of consumer (and industrial) goods and services producers. These tools are invisible, buried in the bowels of Facebook’s servers, they’re opaque algorithms that offer a pretense of objectivity — it’s just a bunch numbers, after all — while being designed and tuned by humans. We now face the prospect of Facebook selling political influence to the highest bidder, or, worse, to the bidder who is deemed the “most correct” according to the company CEO’s taste and goals.


I struggled with this as a parent, maybe you do too…

Parent for More Than PopularityMichael Kelley
There were some challenges I think I was prepared for as a parent…

But one challenge I did not see coming was the popularity challenge.

By that, I don’t mean the particular challenges that come if your children are popular, though those are many. I mean the temptation as a parent to treat popularity as more highly valued than it ought to be. This is what I was not prepared for – the same tug that I felt in middle school, except this time with my own child, to desire popularity for them. Almost at any expense. Of course, you don’t say to your kids, “Be popular,” but I’m finding the temptation to parent for popularity comes out in all kinds of subtle ways…


A Brief History of Walls…
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Wrong Hands

Tuesday Picks ~ 2-28-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

I raised two impressive daughters. These things were always my heart’s intention. I wish I could say I did them well, but I know better…

10 Things I’d Do If I Were Raising a Daughter Today
Ron Edmondson
All women (all people) have scars of some kind. Sadly, I know a few girls – most of them now grown – who have scars caused by a dad. And, the scars caused by a dad may be among the worst.

As I’ve counseled dozens of hurt or angry girls over the years, I’ve often wondered what I would have done if I had raised a girl. Would would I do now if I were raising a girl?

Certainly the world can be a crazy place. Our children need us – perhaps now more than ever. If I were raising a daughter I would want to be wise and intentional. Maybe one dad out there will read this, consider his own role as a father, and be even more intentional in this important responsibility.


This is such a delicate balance. We must stay vigilant if we have any hope of walking this tightrope…

The Two Things We Must Say About the Transgender DebateKevin DeYoung
imagesThe Christian response to the transgender debate depends on whether we are talking about the debate or about a transgender person. I understand the two cannot be completely divorced, but they are not the same thing either. The ideas bandied about in the public square are often ridiculous. The people struggling with gender identity are not…

That means while we do not have patience for secular agendas, we must have patience for struggling people…It means we must show private care in a way that is not confused with public indifference, and make known our public concern in a way that is not confused with private disdain. We have two different things to say depending on the context–not contradictory things, but complementary things the world is eager to confuse. The agenda ought to be lampooned. The people ought to be loved.


You may find this sadly interesting. I did…

The End of the Olympics As We Know ItRodger Sherman
The Olympics are the world’s most internationally revered money-laundering scam. The host country does not pay the International Olympic Committee to host the games. (That would be bribery!) Instead, the host spends a ludicrous amount of money building infrastructure, and the IOC makes a ludicrous amount of money from selling the international television rights and licensing the Olympic name and logo to advertisers. Hypothetically, the host makes the money back in the decades to come by hosting sporting events at its stadiums.

But if that second part never happens — and it almost never does — the IOC has already made its money…

The IOC is a parasite: It latches onto hosts, leeches out all the money it can, and leaves a trail of rotting velodromes in its wake. Luckily, cities across the globe have learned how to fight back.


Back in my day…
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Wrong Hands – Click image for a larger view.

Weekend Picks ~ 2-24-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

Some interesting thoughts for your weekend reading, not that it’ll change your mind at all…

Why Facts Don’t Change Our MindsElizabeth Kolbert
The vaunted human capacity for reason may have more to do with winning arguments than with thinking straight.Even after the evidence “for their beliefs has been totally refuted, people fail to make appropriate revisions in those beliefs,” the researchers noted…

The Stanford studies became famous. Coming from a group of academics in the nineteen-seventies, the contention that people can’t think straight was shocking. It isn’t any longer. Thousands of subsequent experiments have confirmed (and elaborated on) this finding. As everyone who’s followed the research—or even occasionally picked up a copy of Psychology Today—knows, any graduate student with a clipboard can demonstrate that reasonable-seeming people are often totally irrational. Rarely has this insight seemed more relevant than it does right now. Still, an essential puzzle remains: How did we come to be this way?


It’s a fact that people who consider themselves committed to their church actually attend much less often than they used to. I believe it’s an unhealthy development that we should fight to change…

Church Member! Fight to Attend Your Church Weekly!
Geoffrey R. Kirkland
This is not just another paper urging the unsaved to just ‘get to church’. This essay is for those whom God has saved and who have obediently committed themselves to a local church and submitted themselves to the leadership of that church. This is an essay for the saved to reorient the focus on the Lord and on His church because this in our culture can distract and disrupt and cloud our minds at times.

My argument? Fight with all your might to attend your church weekly. I’ll provide 7 simple reminders…


To Give a Good Answer, Sometimes You Have to Change the QuestionMelinda Penner
As Christians representing God’s Word, we have to be able to explain the bigger picture. In the case of homosexuality, pornography, and sex outside of marriage, we need to explain what God’s plan is for human sexuality. The reason there are negatives in the Bible is to protect the positives…

…When confronted with direct questions about what the Bible teaches about sex, you probably need to answer a somewhat different question to give a good answer. Instead of answering the question, “What does the Bible teach about being gay?” it might be more effective to help the asker actually understand the answer if you respond to the more relevant question, “What does the Bible teach is God’s design for sex?” In that context, the answer to the question he asked will make more sense.


Worship leaders, this might be worth thinking about…

http://www.challies.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/Challies_Feb19-25-05.pngPastors, parents, worship leaders: Are you teaching any songs that can be sung acapella around a hospital bed in 50 years? -Kevin DeYoung


Your Kids are Not Family Decision-Makers
Melissa Edgington
Somehow we have gotten it in our heads that kids want a say in everything. Wrong! Kids want you to figure all that life junk out and let them go play with bugs in the backyard…

Childhood is so short. Let kids be kids. I know many of you don’t believe it, but kids like to be told what to do. They like knowing you are in control. It gives them security. It makes them feel protected and taken care of and safe.


If I lived in the wild west…
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Bizarro

Weekend Picks ~ 2-10-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

Encouragement for church leadership…

Are You on Track if You Lead a Church of Less Than 100?
Ed Stetzer
Are You on Track if You Lead a Church of Less Than 100?…church planters need to know that the expectations they see on conference platforms are unrealistic. Pastors need to remember that ministry in the past should not serve as the only measuring stick for ministry in the present. If we don’t remember this, then planters and pastors may see the tremendous success on the stage or in the past and assume they are failures if they don’t reach those virtually impossible-to-reach levels.

It is past time that churches measure success based on the current realities of their cultural context instead of past glories or present-day anomalies.


I appreciated this short interview with Keith Getty…

The Reformation Changed the Way We Sing
Collin Hansen interviews Keith Getty
Luther’s context was similar to ours in some ways—a generation of somewhat-new believers not used to singing. We live in a world today with more Christians than ever before, most of whom have little theological understanding of why we sing, or experience in how to do it. Luther taught why we sing. He also curated songs that gave people a deep, rich understanding of the God of the Bible and the gospel he offers.


This is an excellent article about how to have the conversation no parent ever wants to have, but most likely will…

How to React the First Time Your Child Admits Watching PornJohn Fort
dad holds son safeA parent’s first reaction is so critical. The first words out of our mouth, the first body language we express, has an enormous impact on any future success we may have helping our child. It’s worth thinking about and trying to plan for…

The most important take away for any child in this scenario is to experience that Mom and Dad are safe people to talk about sexual temptations with. If we do not leave our children feeling safe after our first discussion about an exposure that occurred, we are likely cutting off any future chance of them listening to our advice on the matter.


Just in time for Valentine’s Day. I appreciate this article a lot…

If You’re Looking for Romance, It’s Probably Right in Front of YouMelissa Edgington
Someday when I’m sitting in a rocking chair looking back over our life together, it won’t be the big trips or the diamond rings that I remember most. It’ll be all the little things. The small gestures that he makes every day to communicate how much he loves me. If you’re searching for romance in your marriage, chances are you’re ignoring the most romantic things about your life. Stop and think about it, and appreciate all of the little ways that you are being romanced every day. I promise it’ll make marriage more fun and meaningful if you do. Be grateful for what you have and stop pining for a version of marriage that Hollywood dreamed up. Most of the people who wrote that stuff are divorced. Just saying.


The People’s Choice…
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Bizarro – Click image for a larger view.

Tuesday Picks ~ 1-31-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

Every kid and family is different, but he makes a valid point…

Why Our Son Doesn’t Have a SmartphoneTrevin Wax
lightstock_135026_medium_tgc…the real reason why our son doesn’t have a phone is because we think his middle-school years will be better spent without one. The answer I’ve given, over and over again, is this: I want you to be free from middle school drama when you’re at home.

Of course, our son thinks the phone represents a new rung on the ladder, the next step toward the freedom of adulthood. We think the phone, at his age, is a step down into slavery. It traps kids, just like it can trap adults, into the social game of likes and comments and never-ending comparisons.


If we didn’t do these things I think it would help a lot…

7 Ways to Do Political Punditry Wrong in a Polarized WorldKevin DeYoung
…it seems like the promise of “moving past this contentious election season,” is not going to materialize. No doubt, your Twitter feed and your Facebook page are as full as ever with political punditry–much of it well intentioned, only some of it well considered. What are we to do as Christians when there is so much we might want to say, and yet, we’d like to say it in a way that makes a difference instead of just making noise?

Perhaps a look at the negative will point us in a positive direction. Let’s briefly consider seven ways to do political punditry wrong in a polarized world…


The church needs you, and you need the church…

Where Are All The Skinny Jeans Pastors?Stephen McAlpine
Male legs in elegant skinny jeansA US report indicates only one in seven senior pastors is under the age of 40.   It’s a Barna Research piece so it’s got some cred.  You can read the Christianity Today report here.

The research lists nine reasons for the collapse in the younger pastor demographic,  which also shows the average age for a senior pastor is 54, compared to just 44 years of age in 1992…

Let me add a tenth to that – a theological reason – A Poor Ecclesiology.  And it’s this tenth one that could be allowing the other nine listed above to set the agenda… The church is no longer viewed as the locus of God’s work on earth…


My new word for today…

A Necessary CoinageAlan Jacobs

Drumpfengeworfenheit:
The condition of finding oneself “thrown” into Donald Trump’s America.


Software upgrade…
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Dilbert – Click image for a larger view.

Weekend Picks ~ 12-9-2016

xmas-weekend-picks

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

An important seasonal reminder…

The War on ChristmasJonathan Storment
Screen Shot 2016-12-06 at 7.08.24 AMNow today ”Magi” sounds like a very Christmas-y word, but in the day that Christmas actually happened everyone knew that they were the outsiders.
..someone who was trained in the dark arts, things like interpreting dreams, astrology, talking to the dead. You know, just like the Wise Men in the Christmas story that you grew up hearing about.

Today, the church that stands over the Cave where Jesus was born is called the Church of the Holy Nativity…and on the Church there is a mosaic of these Magi. In 614 A.D. when the Persians invaded Jerusalem, they burned all the churches to the ground. But not this one. When they saw the Magi dressed in traditional clothes of the Persians they said here is a church that respects our traditions, and they decided not to destroy it. This little detail may sound trivial to you, but I think that it is incredibly inspiring.

The Christmas story from the very beginning calls into question all the ways we categorize the people of the world into good and bad…

Every year the 24-hour news cycle runs some story about how some retailer has decided to use the term “Happy Holidays” instead of “Merry Christmas” and how some people are upset because we want to do our Black Friday shopping/greed-bonanza to some Christmas carols, the way that the early church would have wanted. Now we Christians will always say things like “Merry Christmas” but my question is when did we decide that this was a policy that we needed to outsource to retail stores?


I loved this little personal memory and reflection…

It Came to Pass in Second GradeSylvia Schroeder
christmasOnce upon a time, long long ago, before people knew better than to celebrate Christmas in schools, when the principal could still haul a student to the office for a whopping, a second grade teacher formed a choir.

Now this choir was made up of twenty children all under the rule of one solitary gray haired woman. The children obeyed her completely because they all knew very well what “or else” meant, and in spite of it, or perhaps because of it, they loved her with all their hearts…


A longer article in the Washington Post for your weekend reading and consideration…

Their Tube: When every moment of childhood can be recorded and shared, what happens to childhood?
Jessica Contrera
Mark Adam adores watching other little boys who do nothing but open eggs with plastic toys inside. Max would rather watch another kid play Minecraft than play it himself. Annie doesn’t aspire to meet celebrities but the girls who get millions of views for braiding hair.

Kids have always learned by mimicking their peers. Now, the children watching YouTube are seeing role models who don’t just play — they perform. They’re not just experiencing childhood, but constantly considering how their experiences will be perceived by an audience.


For church leaders…

How Your Control Freak Tendencies Stunt Your Church’s GrowthCarey Nieuwhof
control freakThere’s a lid that comes with your control freak tendencies. You will eventually hit a wall in which the size of your church shrinks back to the size of your personal span of care. Until you let go.

In other words, if you want to limit your church’s growth, attempt to control everything…

Here are 5 insights that help me remember that controlling everything means you will eventually end up leading nothing significant…


Two Kinds of WinningSeth Godin
Image result for seth godinSome can only win when others lose.

Others seek to win by helping others succeed.

One of these approaches scales far better than the other.


More Nursery Rhyme Headlines…
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Wrong Hands