Tag Archives: Technology

Weekend Picks ~ 5-26-2017

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well..

Why Homesickness Is HealthJen Pollock Michel
https://tgc-cache.s3.amazonaws.com/images/remote/http_s3.amazonaws.com/tgc-ee2/articles/homesick-2.jpgNostalgia may have disappeared from our medical dictionaries, but we haven’t cured the ache for home. To be human is to know the grief of some paradise lost. Each of us—however happily settled—suffers a foreboding sense of rupture, as if we’ve been cut off from some hidden source of happiness…

Home represents humanity’s most visceral ache—and our oldest desire…

The biblical narrative begins and ends at home. From the garden of Eden to the New Jerusalem, we’re hardwired for place and for permanence, for rest and refuge, for presence and protection. We long for home because welcome was our first gift of grace, and it will be our last.


In the 80s I was in youth ministry and almost 30 years old, but pretty much addicted to Ms. Pac-Man…

Children of the ‘80s Never Fear: Video Games Did Not Ruin Your LifeMichael Z. Newman
https://www.arcade-museum.com/images/109/1092874315.jpgThere is a particularly American tradition of becoming enthralled with new technologies of communication, identifying their promise of future prosperity and renewed community. It is matched by a related American tradition of freaking out about the same objects, which are also figured as threats to life as we know it…

Somehow, a generation of teenagers from the 1980s managed to grow up despite the dangers, real or imagined, from video games. The new technology could not have been as powerful as its detractors or its champions imagined. It’s easy to be captivated by novelty, but it can force us to miss the cyclical nature of youth media obsessions. Every generation fastens onto something that its parents find strange, whether Elvis or Atari. In every moment in media history, intergenerational tension accompanies the emergence of new forms of culture and communication.


This is a wonderful guide for a powerful personal worship time…

70 Prompts for Praising GodLianna Davis
70 prompts for praising God. a theology blog for women.

“My mouth is filled with Your praise,
and with Your glory all the day.”

Ps. 71:8

Praise Him with me through this list of 70 prompts…


This reflection on a father, being a father, and our heavenly Father really touched me…

Broken ShadowsBrad Larson
https://cbmw.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/AdobeStock_53546475-554x360.jpegFathers are shadows. As the light of God shines upon them, their children who come after them should be able to rest in the shadows of God’s grace. A benevolent, loving God should not be something hard to believe in. But the problem is that we fathers are broken shadows. We are fallible and sinful and underqualified to shepherd other eternal human beings.

That’s where grace comes in.


Walt Mossberg has been writing a weekly column on tech stuff since 1991. This is his final piece and he predicts a fascinating future…

The Disappearing ComputerWalt Mossberg
I expect that one end result of all this work will be that the technology, the computer inside all these things, will fade into the background. In some cases, it may entirely disappear, waiting to be activated by a voice command, a person entering the room, a change in blood chemistry, a shift in temperature, a motion. Maybe even just a thought.

Your whole home, office and car will be packed with these waiting computers and sensors. But they won’t be in your way, or perhaps even distinguishable as tech devices.

This is ambient computing, the transformation of the environment all around us with intelligence and capabilities that don’t seem to be there at all.


Smarter phones…
https://wronghands1.files.wordpress.com/2017/05/future-phones.jpg
Wrong Hands

Thursday Picks ~ 10-6-2016

Picks Thursday

This is some stuff I found helpful, challenging, interesting, or amusing today that I think may enrich your day as well...

Please, fellow Christ-followers, let’s not forget what’s truly important…

What Christians Should Do This Election Season — Give Space, Show GraceTrevin Wax
photo-1464660756002-dd9f9a92b01bChristians, of all people, should remember that politics is not ultimate. There are more important things in life, truths that unite us across party lines into one body of Christ. Most of the issues we debate at the dinner table must fade away at the Table of our Lord.

So should we resort to publicly shaming people who decide to vote for one of these candidates? Twist the arms of those who, out of conscience, withhold their vote? Pounce on people when something happens you think makes them regret the decision they’ve made?

When we blast people who have come to a different ethical conclusion about the best way forward this election cycle, we give the impression that this year’s election choice is ultimate. We look just like people on the right and left who live and breathe politics because they don’t see anything higher.

This won’t do. I have too many friends and family members and fellow church members on all sides of Election 2016 to let their choice in the voting booth affect my affection for them.

So, I’m trying to do two things, and I hope you’ll join me…


Challenging…

God Would Never Ask Me to Sacrifice My Kids….Right?
Amy Medina
The cost of following Jesus in North Korea is not just your job, not just your well-being, not just your freedom… but your whole family.  Your mom, your brother, your children can be put in a prison camp, raped, or run over by a steamroller because you chose Jesus.

It’s incomprehensible.  Unfathomable.

I know so little of sacrifice… 

Besides….God would never ask me to sacrifice my kids….right?

Yet I worship the same God who has asked exactly that of the North Korean Christians. I stand under the same sky, breathe the same air, and have the same kind of soul as they do.   Who am I to think that he wouldn’t ask the same of me?


What we do online is not only public, it is influential…

Every Click CountsDavid Mathis
Every click is a kind of vote. Every time you click, you say, in effect, I want this — and more of this. And someone hears you…

Negatively, the implications are plain enough. Every unrighteous click expresses and encourages sin. Every sordid click casts your vote for more sordidness online…

…but don’t hear me saying I’m down on the Internet … We should not only mind the dangers, but also open our eyes to the remarkable opportunities.

Every righteous click has some small righteous effect in our world. When you make a good click, you register a vote for righteousness. And what content you “share” will be seen by others who otherwise may not have seen it. What you “like,” and comment on, contributes to algorithms that serve up quality content to others, even people you do not know. Clicking alone will not complete the Great Commission, but it’s not irrelevant. You make the world a better or worse place with every click.


I don’t really think this sounds like the Beatles, but it is kind of fascinating…

Artificial Intelligence Program Tries to Write a Beatles Song: Listen to “Daddy’s Car”Ted Mills

Flow Machine has returned with an interesting development: two upcoming albums of A.I.-created songs, from which two tunes have been released to give you a taste of computer creativity. French composer and musician Benoît Carré helped out with the arrangements and production of the songs, and also wrote the lyrics, so it’s not completely an A.I. creation, we should note.

So what should we make of “Daddy’s Car,” above, an attempt to create an A.I song in the style of the Beatles? The opening seconds feature the three-part harmony of “Because,” but when the band kicks in, it’s closer to the Beach Boys’ Pet Sounds than the Fab Four. (If anything, it’s closer to the High Llamas.)

But does it sound like it was written by a human? Yes.


Dr. Frankenstein’s secret formula…
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Off the Mark